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math classes / tuition for toddlers? Rss

Hi

Can anyone point me to any math classes or tutors that have experience with two-year olds and above?

Cheers

XS

Why do you want a maths tutor for a 2 yr old? Maths at 2 is learning to count rocks in the garden and how many fingers you have. You don't need tutoring to do this...




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Thanks for the reply - if you know of any tutors or classes that are available in the Canberra region, that would be great.

XS

XS

Skubala wrote:
Why do you want a maths tutor for a 2 yr old? Maths at 2 is learning to count rocks in the garden and how many fingers you have. You don't need tutoring to do this...

ditto

to the OP- why do feel the need for a tutor ar 2 yrs old?

mum of 3 boys aged 11, 13 and 14

Hi there

Reasons are personal, thanks.

XS.

XS

No I'm sorry I don't know anyone in that area. You could always phone around, I always assumed that tutoring was more tailored to school aged children. Maybe you could look up online resources that you can do with your child.




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Thanks, will do so. I've found that it's useful to get some views on services online without dropping names. Can help the selection process smile

Skubala wrote:
No I'm sorry I don't know anyone in that area. You could always phone around, I always assumed that tutoring was more tailored to school aged children. Maybe you could look up online resources that you can do with your child.

XS

I don't think anyone will be able to give you names of tutors for toddlers because they're toddlers. That profession should not exist.
Seriously? Why would you want your two year old to have math tutoring? That's ridiculous!

Let the kid be a kid for goodness sake! At that age they are still learning how to learn. And just because some children can count up to 50 when they're tiny doesn't actually count for anything. It just means they have a good memory, not that they actually understand the concept of numbers. That comes later on.




"Parenting is the easiest thing in the world to have an opinion about, but the hardest thing in the world to do."

I reckon my 2 yr old has learnt a lot about division recently - like making sure she gets equal numbers of whatever nice food I am eating tongue




Follow my blog "Bed Rest for Baby" at http://www.babysteps1804.wordpress.com

Our eldest boy is quite bright, at 2 he knew how to spell his name, his brothers names and a friends name too.( not write it but that came not long after).He could count very well to 20 and over.He was and is a naturally bright kid. We did get some of those little books from the news agent/big w etc with stickers etc and he loved his 'school books'.Perhaps the better thing for your child is enrolment at a day care/preschool which has an emphasis on early education.Our kids went to a great centre and learned a lot there too.Fast forward to school. ds1 always topped him grade until year 5 & 6 when he was at a different school in an OC class( opportunity class for gifted and talented students).He then finally had some 'competition' with kids at his level or brighter which was great.Now he is about to commence his 2nd year of high school (yr8) and finished year 7 as a straight A student, topping his year in maths- he has never has a tutor.Sorry if that sounds like bragging or something but I still dont see the need for a formal tutor at that age

mum of 3 boys aged 11, 13 and 14

Thanks - my niece is in a similar position to the one your described below. She is already enrolled in an early-learning centre that emphasises education. She is outstripping her peers in math but gets shy around older kids, so the director has suggested a tutor to extend her, hence the question. If all else fails, I'll try and re-organise work hours to help my sister out.

Thanks for a non-judgemental reply btw.

XS

vkw wrote:
Our eldest boy is quite bright, at 2 he knew how to spell his name, his brothers names and a friends name too.( not write it but that came not long after).He could count very well to 20 and over.He was and is a naturally bright kid. We did get some of those little books from the news agent/big w etc with stickers etc and he loved his 'school books'.Perhaps the better thing for your child is enrolment at a day care/preschool which has an emphasis on early education.Our kids went to a great centre and learned a lot there too.Fast forward to school. ds1 always topped him grade until year 5 & 6 when he was a different school in an OC class( opportunity class for gifted and talented students).He then finally had some 'competition' with kids at his level or brighter which was great.Now he is about to commence his 2nd year of high school (yr8) and finished year 7 as a straight A student, topping his year in maths- he has never has a tutor.Sorry if that sounds like bragging or something but I still dont see the need for a formal tutor at that age

XS

Firstly no disrespect to the OP, who I am sure is asking with the right intentions. I do have a question - what kind of things would you expect a tutor for mathematics to 'teach' a toddler? What would your expectations be and how would the 'lesson' proceed?

Personally, I feel that if you put too much pressure on children academically too young, you are setting them up to fail, rather than succeed as you intended.

A head start doesn't mean they will always be 'ahead'. More often than not they will start off being 'the best' but often peers catch up to them at some point and things even out. For example, if you teach a child to read at 4 or if you teach a child to read at 7, by 10 years old they likely will both be reading at the same level (there is plenty of research around to support this). The child then feels like they have failed because they are no longer 'the best'. Of course they haven't failed, they just perceive it as that because they are no longer 'the best'.

If your niece is naturally good - probably even gifted at maths, why not invest some time and energy into helping her develop the social/emotional skills she will need to be a well rounded/balanced person as she gets older? The window of opportunity for learning social/emotional skills is at its greatest when children are young.

I would like to encourage the OP to spend some time researching child development and the pros/cons of 'extending' children academically at such a young age before proceeding with a 'maths tutor for a toddler'.

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