Huggies Forum

Is this acceptable???? Rss

Posted by: Beck_JaydenEllaBrody
No.. we had no warning. I dropped him off one day and noticed a big glass terrarium (or whatever they are called) and just assumed there was some lizards in there then the next day it had like a 2m long snake in it... so i thought it mustve just been there for the kids to look at... then that afternoon they had photos up of all the kids touching the snake and holding its tail etc..


HOLY CRAP!!! If I had any other options for childcare I would be withdrawing my child immediately from the centre myself. It think, in the case of something like a snake, all parents should have been notified of their intention to bring a snake into the centre full time and all parents should have been given the chance to voice objections to the idea.

I have no issues with a school/preschool getting a visitor from a reptile park in to show some snakes and lizards in and to educate them on what to do if they see a snake because they will be taught that some snakes are dangerous etc and it would be an educational experience and a one off thing but not a full time pet.





it has a bit of an ick factor for me too. i wouldnt like it, nor would i like spiders or anything like that in there. it seems to me a potentially dangerous thing to have around children of such a young age.

i'd much prefer a mouse or similar...
Posted by: JennaJ
gkn - I think, and it seems a lot of others do to, that the problem is kids that young can't differentiate between a pet snake and a snake they see out in the 'wild' IYKWIM
They would see a snake and think, "Oh well, it's ok for me to touch the snake at kindy/pre-school/child care (whatever it is), so I'm sure it'd be ok if I touched this one."

I think that's one of the main issues here..


Ok, but a child who is too young to differentiate between a pet snake and a wild snake would also be too young to be playing outside unsupervised, especially if there are snakes around.

It's the same as if they have a pet dog, they may see a stray and think, "my dog's friendly, so this one must be too."
Posted by: gkn
Posted by: JennaJ
gkn - I think, and it seems a lot of others do to, that the problem is kids that young can't differentiate between a pet snake and a snake they see out in the 'wild' IYKWIM
They would see a snake and think, "Oh well, it's ok for me to touch the snake at kindy/pre-school/child care (whatever it is), so I'm sure it'd be ok if I touched this one."

I think that's one of the main issues here..


Ok, but a child who is too young to differentiate between a pet snake and a wild snake would also be too young to be playing outside unsupervised, especially if there are snakes around.

It's the same as if they have a pet dog, they may see a stray and think, "my dog's friendly, so this one must be too."


Just out of curiosity, do you live in the city or in a rural bush area?
Are you serious you wont let your kids paly in an enclosed yard while you are not out there?? I cant wait for our fence to go up so N can play out there when Im not there every second. I dont mean leavre him completely by himself but so I can duck inside wityhout dragging him with me. All it takes is for your back to be turned for a split second for your child to go to toouch a snake and for a snake to strike. If there is a snake ther it doesnt mean you are going to see it, my friend found a brown snake in her sons pool floatie the other day.
Posted by: .Sadie.
Just out of curiosity, do you live in the city or in a rural bush area?


Atm, I live in the city. But I grew up (from 13) in a more rural bush area. I saw plenty of snakes, I have caught a blue tongue lizard in my backyard, it was cute smile. It's the spiders that scare the crap out of me.
Beck, I'd be horrified if my two were in daycare and a 2m live in snake was there. I don't see what is wrong with having the good old mouse, or guinea pig or goldfish as a pet. Why do they have to try and top things by getting a snake!

I would most definately raise it with the local shire in R, (your town) and also make a complaint with the centre manager.


It's all good and well for people to suggest that if your child can't differentiate with snakes in the wild that are not to be touched compared to a 'harmless' carpet python etc at daycare - then they shouldn't be left unsupervised.

Put yourself in the shoes of someone (if you could actually imagine it, if you haven't ventured from the city out in the bush, it's pretty safe to say you won't be able to envisage this) who lives in a remote rural area, and snakes are around all the time, you run over them on a regular basis driving on dirt roads around town. It's not a concrete city you live in, it's dry arid ground with long grass, upturned trees, stumps, culvets, creeks, dams and empty paddocks etc with plenty of hidey holes that the snakes like to come out from at random times of the day. Slither out next to your leg from inside foliage in your vegie garden as you go to pick carrots for that nights dinner.

Imagine it being your 2 yo picking the carrots, right there beside you 'supervised'. How the hell can you try and tell that child that snakes are nasty and don't touch them when all they can think of is how cool the snake is at daycare, and they try to touch it as it slithers around?


Imagine your child picking a carrot, or riding their bike or running along within metres of you, and a snake appears. They are not unsupervised, they are only metres away as you walk along side them riding their bike in their yard or dirt road or across the paddock being supervised, but a snake appears between yourself and them - in the childs eyes, wow it's a snake just like at daycare how cool!! As they are too young to realise the extent of the danger of being near the slithering brown snake ( using our most common snake here for example) that is only metres away between them and mummy.

That is why I don't think snakes belong in child care centres as a pet. Yes a demo by a wildlife person to show the snakes, but not a 2m live in snake that they get to touch and play with as they like.

That is just my two cents worth.
As much as I HATE snakes - I must admit I dont see the harm in having one at DC.

We recently went to a reptile park where my 3 yr old son held both a carpet python and a baby saltwater croc. I have to say that I have had to have the talk with him that that snake (which he held) and snakes in our yard (we live in suburbia Brisbane, but our home backs onto a water/parkland) are 2 totally different things.

To me it is the same as going out for a walk (or even being at our local shopping centre where they train guide dogs) - I explain to him that they are NOT our puppy/pet - so we are not allowed to touch. He seems to understand that concept.
ok I have been thinking and even taking away the fact the centre did not inform parents of the snake being introduced into the room, ignore the possible confusion it could cause for children who do not grasp the whole preditor or pet thing I personally would be livid about the fact they allowed my child to handle a reptile without my knowlege or concent... So no
atter how you look at it the centre have made a big mess out of what could have been a wonderful experience for the children. At worst they are in breach best they are guilty of making very poor decisions I would be talking to the director and if no results calling the dept of child safety or your council. I hope the centre are at least being proactive and not just making it all happy joy about snakes sad

I would also be curious as to what they are feeding it and when, my friend feeds theirs mainly mice!!!!

Leigha''s little men smile

My son is also very fond of snakes. A lot more than I am. His Dad has been letting him handle pythons (some well over 2 metres) for a couple of years now and also dead venomus snakes. He is now 3.5 years old. We also have very dangerous snakes where we live. We have educated him to be careful as there is a big difference between good snakes and bad snakes both of which can be seen very regularly where we live. I am pleased to note that through our education he has a very real understanding that he can't just go up to any snake and that he needs to check with us before approaching one. I've found that teaching him about snakes has been a real advantage because on any day he's very likely to encounter one in our yard. I used to be annoyed when he viewed Bindi Erwin on TV or a DVD handling snakes and thought he'd get the wrong idea and pick up any snake but this has never caused any concern. Educating children when they are young can be a real advantage but with all young children, whether it be snakes, pets, water or whatever, parents still need to stay ever vigilant.

Kerrie, Nth WA, Mum of ERIC JOAL

Morning, I am wondering if you have spoken to the service yet, and what their response was?
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