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How can i teach my 4 1/2yr old DS to... Lock Rss

So, for the past 4ish weeks DS1 has been having some shocking outbursts in his behaviour, if he gets his mind set on something (for example he came out of his room just before, it's bedtime, and said mum you said you were going to show me my school clothes today and i said well it's bedtime now i will show you when you wake in the morning and he lost he saying "NO!I want to see them now, was growling and yelling and when i put him back in his room he was hitting the back of his door and yelling out etc) he just looses it.

It can be over anything, big or small, especially when i ask him to do something and he doesn't want to.

Im not sure what to do? Any advice or experience?

TIA smile

Hi! I think it is normal behaviour really. I don't have boys, but my girls all experience periods of anger now and again. I think it's part of growing up, and getting frustrated with things, not knowing why you feel the way you do, etc - especially when they get hormone surges and that kind of thing. I have tried various things with my older daughter, such as meditation, hitting the punching bag, having her sit quietly in her room, diverting her attention from the problem somehow, and these have all had varying levels of success. A friend of mine took her son to an anger management course, and she says it has helped him immensely, though he is older - 8 years. I hope this helps!

kerrie, VIC, DD 12/8/03, DD 12/10/05, DD 14/9/07, DD 4/1/10


So, for the past 4ish weeks DS1 has been having some shocking outbursts in his behaviour, if he gets his mind set on something (for example he came out of his room just before, it's bedtime, and said mum you said you were going to show me my school clothes today and i said well it's bedtime now i will show you when you wake in the morning and he lost he saying "NO!I want to see them now, was growling and yelling and when i put him back in his room he was hitting the back of his door and yelling out etc) he just looses it.

It can be over anything, big or small, especially when i ask him to do something and he doesn't want to.

Im not sure what to do? Any advice or experience?

TIA smile

no advice but hugs, its a boy thing I think ours have all been through it and sometimes still do angry

mum of 3 boys aged 11, 13 and 14

I'm interested in any replies. DS1 has just turned 4, and sometimes if something doesn't go his way, or DD is harassing him, he screams and lashes out, or he shakes in frustration. I have to take a questionnaire back to our CHN and that's one of the questions i have for her about how to deal with it.

So, for the past 4ish weeks DS1 has been having some shocking outbursts in his behaviour, if he gets his mind set on something (for example he came out of his room just before, it's bedtime, and said mum you said you were going to show me my school clothes today and i said well it's bedtime now i will show you when you wake in the morning and he lost he saying "NO!I want to see them now, was growling and yelling and when i put him back in his room he was hitting the back of his door and yelling out etc) he just looses it.

It can be over anything, big or small, especially when i ask him to do something and he doesn't want to.

Im not sure what to do? Any advice or experience?

TIA smile


Hmmmm, welcome to the 2nd testosterone surge of his life! He is probably learning about control now too and wanting things to be done when you said and not changing it.
Try keeping things in more of a routine now. Testosterone fueled animals (horses, human males etc) love routine so maybe try that and see how you go.

The anger and frustration is showing an inability to control the situation and that they are so desperate to be noticed and heard. Try talking calmly and asking them questions about what he wants and why he is fusturated. Obviously, giving him everything he wants is not going to work, but explaining things properly and talking to him like an adult will go a long way.
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