Expert panel: Sleep

Questions about Sleep

Avatar Jasmi...
Jane ...
Answer:

It may be, if your baby is happy and healthy and thriving and meeting all his milestones, then for him, it may be fine. But if he's waking during h...

Answered: 06 Apr 2013
Avatar Dani_N
Jane ...
Answer:

You'll need to give him a little leeway in relation to his past experiences and his condition. Would it be worth speaking with his doctor to ensure...

Answered: 06 Apr 2013
Avatar Ranis...
Jane ...
Answer:

You cannot make her go to sleep, you can only provide her with the opportunity to sleep and be aware of her tired signs and put her into her cot wh...

Answered: 31 Mar 2013
Avatar Leghr...
Jane ...
Answer:

At the age of two years, a daytime sleep of 1.5-2 hours is generally sufficient. By the age of three, most kids are ready to drop their daytime sle...

Answered: 31 Mar 2013
Avatar Celes...
Jane ...
Answer:

Unless he has a genuine need for you to be lying with him when he goes to sleep, then you need to stop doing this. He's probably become dependent o...

Answered: 10 Mar 2013
Avatar Doi_Bri
Jane ...
Answer:

It does sound as if you're doing everything you can do at this stage. It's great that you're putting him into his cot when he's awake and are sooth...

Answered: 06 Mar 2013
Avatar Genev...
Jane ...
Answer:

Hi Gen, Sleep changes are common in this age group, even for babies who until then have done very well and have been predictable with their sleep. ...

Answered: 02 Mar 2013
Avatar Belll...
Jane ...
Answer:

It may be worthwhile looking at her weight and growth charts to make sure she's thriving and getting enough feeds and solids through the day to sup...

Answered: 03 Mar 2013
Avatar E_Doh...
Jane ...
Answer:

It's not the ideal way to sleep, what you've heard is correct. The best position is on the side, preferably the left side which will maximise the b...

Answered: 23 Feb 2013
Avatar Member
Jane ...
Answer:

Perhaps she's learnt that she's getting lots of lovely attention when she's wanting it overnight. If everything is settling down now and you're in ...

Answered: 23 Feb 2013
Avatar sherr...
Jane ...
Answer:

Have you checked out the Huggies site for the "camping out" method? This sounds like it would help you. Think too about what the current "pay off" ...

Answered: 23 Feb 2013
Avatar Livia...
Jane ...
Answer:

If he ends up in your bed, then he won't be learning how to resettle himself when he wakes. I understand that due to your pregnancy you're probably...

Answered: 16 Feb 2013
Avatar Jmcin...
Jane ...
Answer:

He sounds like he's a little young for night terrors, my understanding is that these occur closer to the preschool years when imagination can fuel ...

Answered: 12 Feb 2013
Avatar Cyndi...
Jane ...
Answer:

Kids sleep changes all the time and often reflects other changes going on in their lives. Perhaps this is one way for her to be gaining some one on...

Answered: 12 Feb 2013
Avatar Glenw...
Jane ...
Answer:

You don't say how old your baby is, but I'm guessing pretty young? There's generally a change in poos when formula is introduced or changed, khaki ...

Answered: 12 Feb 2013
Avatar AB74
Jane ...
Answer:

You need some support from an early parenting centre if you're saying you simply cannot cope anymore. Get a referral from your CHN or your GP for a...

Answered: 12 Feb 2013
Avatar Becstone
Jane ...
Answer:

I don't want to offer you any conflicting advice to what Tresillian has provided you with. It can take a few weeks to consolidate any change once h...

Answered: 12 Feb 2013
Avatar Pinel...
Jane ...
Answer:

Hi Nicky, It may be teething, separation anxiety or behavioural association. To be honest, it's hard to say. But if you are sure she is well and he...

Answered: 16 Feb 2013
Avatar Troya...
Jane ...
Answer:

At four months of age it's utterly normal for her to still wake overnight and need feeding. It won't be until she's closer to six months that she's...

Answered: 02 Feb 2013
Avatar Jeane...
Jane ...
Answer:

Absolutely, I've heard this pattern so many times over the years it does seem to be pretty normal. It's not even so much hunger which will often wa...

Answered: 26 Jan 2013
Avatar Mhali...
Jane ...
Answer:

Well, you won't be able to get him to sleep through the night without waking. This is normal for all of us, but it's his association with needing t...

Answered: 26 Jan 2013
Avatar klcla...
Jane ...
Answer:

Hi, The issue that strikes me from your query is that this is normal, normal, normal! Four years olds, especially boys commonly wet at night and o...

Answered: 20 Jan 2013
Avatar Arbrears
Jane ...
Answer:

Oh, you've tried so hard - good on you for being so thorough in your managment of this. But I do wonder if that old adage "less is more" may apply ...

Answered: 20 Jan 2013
Avatar Kayj_...
Jane ...
Answer:

It does sound as if you're doing what you can, but perhaps you just need to stick with it for longer. Eventually he'll learn there's no point in al...

Answered: 18 Jan 2013
Avatar lissey
Jane ...
Answer:

If he has learnt to rely on you to go to sleep; nursing him or co sleeping then he won't have learnt the skills involved in settling himself. It is...

Answered: 20 Jan 2013
Avatar Belle...
Jane ...
Answer:

It may help to check what she's eating through the day and ensure she's having sufficient food to sustain her appetite overnight. Protein, iron and...

Answered: 12 Jan 2013
Avatar shell...
Jane ...
Answer:

There's always a balance between providing gentle reassurance and comforting and not being swept up into the child's reluctance to settle and behav...

Answered: 05 Jan 2013
Avatar Tandb...
Jane ...
Answer:

He's still entitled to at least one overnight feed until closer to six months of age, so yes, to expect him to sleep for 9 hours without a feed at ...

Answered: 05 Jan 2013